Concussion

Concussion

Concussion arrived in theaters on Dec. 25. The movie was an informative and entertaining piece of art. The graphics and the mentality of the human mind were portrayed beautifully in this movie.
Concussion is based on a true story  in which Will Smith stars as Dr. Bennet Omalu, who is a Nigerian forensic pathologist. Omalu discovered a neurological deterioration that is similar to Alzheimer’s disease in the brain known as Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE). American football players are prone to CTE after multiple traumatic events, such as a concussion, occurs.
The movie depicts actual events which have occurred in two retired players, including Mike Webster, when their brains go into a state of confusion and hearing voices, literally going crazy. Webster was the first player ever diagnosed with CTE and depicts the first time Omalu discovers this disease.
There is a small scene of events between fans and doctors during Omalu’s research. Such as protest and newspaper articles about what he’s doing behind closed doors. However, the National Football League was avoiding this research until the very end of the movie, and stating they are doing their own research. Omalu shot back with, “If they continue to deny my work man continues to die.” This is the greatest quote to describe the NFL and their ignorance on the issue.
The end of the movie left me with more questions than answers about how to keep players safe during their time on the field. The hard hitting facts and heartfelt scenes seem to make this movie nothing less than amazing. There were a few parts where I was almost in tears, and others when I was raging but mostly internal screaming about how right this movie is about depicting the sport. I encourage everyone, football fan or not, to go see this, just because of the learning and dialogue.
At the very end, I walked out realizing that football is beautifully terrible to the humans who play. The agility of a player and the hits to the same beloved player all lead to some sort of a glorified concussion.